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Q. What is Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a chronic immune-mediated disease that appears on the skin. It occurs when the immune system sends out faulty signals that speed up the growth cycle of skin cells. Psoriasis is not contagious. There are five types of psoriasis: plaque, guttate, inverse, pustular and erythrodermic. The most common form, plaque psoriasis, is commonly seen as red and white hues of scaly patches appearing on the top first layer of the epidermis (skin). Some patients, though, have no dermatological symptoms.

In plaque psoriasis, skin rapidly accumulates at these sites, which gives it a silvery-white appearance. Plaques frequently occur on the skin of the elbows and knees, but can affect any area, including the scalp, palms of hands and soles of feet, and genitals. In contrast to eczema, psoriasis is more likely to be found on the outer side of the joint.

The disorder is a chronic recurring condition that varies in severity from minor localized patches to complete body coverage. Fingernails and toenails are frequently affected (psoriatic nail dystrophy) and can be seen as an isolated symptom. Psoriasis can also cause inflammation of the joints, which is known as psoriatic arthritis. Between 10% and 40% of all people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis.

The cause of psoriasis is not fully understood, but it is believed to have a genetic component and local psoriatic changes can be triggered by an injury to the skin known as the Koebner phenomenon. Various environmental factors have been suggested as aggravating to psoriasis, including stress, withdrawal of systemic corticosteroid, as well as other environmental factors, but few have shown statistical significance.There are many treatments available, but because of its chronic recurrent nature, psoriasis is a challenge to treat.The Excimer Laser has been added to the arsenal of state-of-the-art equipment at A Solution For Beauty Cosmetic & Laser Center in Tamarac and Boca Raton to treat Psoriasis, Alopecia and Vitiligo.

Q. What are the benefits of the Excimer Laser?

At A Solution For Beauty Cosmetic & Laser Center, we have recently acquired the Excimer Laser which is used to treat psoriasis, vitiligo (loss of pigment) and some other types of rashes that itch. The procedure is also a great treatment for psoriasis of the scalp. The problem can be decreased or eliminated after a few treatments. It can be done in conjunction with other treatments, and is wonderful for psoriasis on the elbows, hands and knees. It’s painless, quick and can be performed in the office. The treatments are covered by Medicare, and most private insurance companies."I just can't believe the results that I have achieved over the past several months. Our patients are so excited by seeing their symptoms significantly reduced".

Q. How long does the procedure take and what are the after-affects?

Each procedure is medically supervised and may take anywhere from 15 to 45 minutes depending on how extensive the problem is. There may be a mild redness or a minor blister, but they generally fade very quickly. Q. How many treatments are required, and what is the success rate?

We normally schedule treatments twice weekly. The remission time varies anywhere from a couple of weeks to several months, depending on the patient. The Excimer is state-of-the-art compared to other lasers used for this treatment, and our success rate is extremely high.

Severity

Psoriasis is usually graded as mild (affecting less than 3% of the body), moderate (affecting 3–10% of the body) or severe. Several scales exist for measuring the severity of psoriasis. The degree of severity is generally based on the following factors: the proportion of body surface area affected; disease activity (degree of plaque redness, thickness and scaling); response to previous therapies; and the impact of the disease on the person.


The Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) is the most widely used measurement tool for psoriasis. PASI combines the assessment of the severity of lesions and the area affected into a single score in the range 0 (no disease) to 72 (maximal disease). Nevertheless, the PASI can be too unwieldy to use outside of trials, which has led to attempts to simplify the index for clinical use.

Cause

The cause of psoriasis is not fully understood. There are two main hypotheses about the process that occurs in the development of the disease. The first considers psoriasis as primarily a disorder of excessive growth and reproduction of skin cells. The problem is simply seen as a fault of the epidermis and its keratinocytes. The second hypothesis sees the disease as being an immune-mediated disorder in which the excessive reproduction of skin cells is secondary to factors produced by the immune system. T cells (which normally help protect the body against infection) become active, migrate to the dermis and trigger the release of cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha TNFα, in particular) which cause inflammation and the rapid production of skin cells. It is not known what initiates the activation of the T cells.

The immune-mediated model of psoriasis has been supported by the observation that immunosuppressant medications can clear psoriasis plaques. However, the role of the immune system is not fully understood, and it has recently been reported that an animal model of psoriasis can be triggered in mice lacking T cells.

Psoriasis is a fairly idiosyncratic disease. The majority of people's experience of psoriasis is one in which it may worsen or improve for no apparent reason. Studies of the factors associated with psoriasis tend to be based on small (usually hospital based) samples of individuals. These studies tend to suffer from representative issues, and an inability to tease out causal associations in the face of other (possibly unknown) intervening factors. Conflicting findings are often reported. Nevertheless, the first outbreak is sometimes reported following stress (physical and mental), skin injury, and streptococcal infection.

Conditions that have been reported as accompanying a worsening of the disease include infections, stress, and changes in season and climate. Certain medicines, including lithium salt, beta blockers and the antimalarial drug chloroquine have been reported to trigger or aggravate the disease. Excessive alcohol consumption, smoking and obesity may exacerbate psoriasis or make the management of the condition difficult or perhaps these comorbidities are effects rather than causes. Some face creams and hand lotions, can also cause an outbreak of psoriasis.

Psoriasis occurs more likely in dry skin than oily or well-moisturized skin, and specifically after an external skin injury such as a scratch or cut. This is believed to be caused by an infection, in which the infecting organism thrives under dry skin conditions with minimal skin oil, which otherwise protects skin from infections. The case for psoriasis is opposite to the case of athlete's foot, which occurs because of a fungus infection under wet conditions as opposed to dry in psoriasis. This infection induces inflammation, which causes the symptoms commonly associated with psoriasis, such as itching and rapid skin turnover, and leads to drier skin, as the infecting organism absorbs the moisture that would otherwise go to the skin. To prevent dry skin and reduce psoriasis symptoms, it is advised to not use shower scrubs, as they not only damage skin by leaving tiny scratches, but they also scrape off the naturally occurring skin oil. It is recommended to use talc powder after washing, as that helps absorb excess moisture which would otherwise go to the skin oil gland functions. Additionally, moisturizers can be applied to  promote moisturize the skin, and lotions used to promote skin oil gland functions. 

Don't suffer any longer.....call us at  A Solution For Beauty Cosmetic & Laser Center to schedukle your appointment.

 

To make an appointment, contact us at (754) 222-7458.   

Schedule your consultation with our doctors for this condition today!

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